HEDS is part of the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield. We undertake research, teaching, training and consultancy on all aspects of health related decision science, with a particular emphasis on health economics, HTA and evidence synthesis.

Thursday, 22 October 2020

ScHARR 2020 Pemberton Lecture Yvonne Coghill : "Why race equality in our NHS is important”

ScHARR 2020 Pemberton Lecture Yvonne Coghill : "Why race equality in our NHS is important”

Book your ticket here
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/scharr-2020-pemberton-lecture-yvonne-coghill-race-equality-and-the-nhs-tickets-126039187603



Yvonne Coghill


About this Event

We are delighted to invite you to attend the 2020 ScHARR Pemberton Lecture. This year’s speaker is Yvonne Coghill.

Yvonne commenced nurse training at Central Middlesex Hospital in 1977, qualified as a general nurse in 1980 and then went on to qualify in mental health nursing and health visiting. In 1986 she secured her first NHS management job and has since held a number of operational and strategic leadership posts. In 2004, she was appointed at the Department of Health as Private Secretary to the Chief Executive of the NHS, Sir Nigel Crisp. Yvonne most recently acted as the Director of WRES Implementation in NHS England, and deputy president of the RCN.

The lecture will take place on Wednesday 11th November 2020, 15:00-16:30 via BlackBoard Collaborate.

The link to the lecture will be added to this page and shared with all registered attendees via email, 24 hours in advance of the lecture.

Yvonne’s abstract explains further:

Our NHS is one of the biggest and in England, one of the best-loved organisations in the country. The English NHS has 1.4 million members of staff, 20% of whom are from non-white backgrounds and many of these people work on the front line, as Doctors, nurses as well as administrative and hospitality staff, indeed it has been acknowledged that without staff from overseas the NHS would all but grind to a halt.

The importance of ensuring that all staff, regardless of background are valued and appreciated and encouraged to be the best they can be, should not be underestimated, because the evidence is that a valued and motivated workforce delivers high quality patient care, a safer service and leaves patients more satisfied. This talk will focus on the challenges faced by the NHS in making sure that it adheres to the public sector equality duty of ensuing we promote equality and are seen as a beacon of best practice in this area.

Wednesday, 14 October 2020

New ReQoL paper - An item response theory analysis of an item pool for the recovering quality of life (ReQoL) measure

Picture of Dr Anju Devianee Keetharuth
Dr Anju Devianee Keetharuth

An item response theory analysis of an item pool for the recovering quality of life (ReQoL) measure


ReQoL-10 and ReQoL-20 have been developed for use as outcome measures with individuals aged 16 and over, experiencing mental health difficulties. 






Purpose
ReQoL-10 and ReQoL-20 have been developed for use as outcome measures with individuals aged 16 and over, experiencing mental health difficulties. This paper reports modelling results from the item response theory (IRT) analyses that were used for item reduction.

Methods
From several stages of preparatory work including focus groups and a previous psychometric survey, a pool of items was developed. After confirming that the ReQoL item pool was sufficiently unidimensional for scoring, IRT model parameters were estimated using Samejima’s Graded Response Model (GRM). All 39 mental health items were evaluated with respect to item fit and differential item function regarding age, gender, ethnicity, and diagnosis. Scales were evaluated regarding overall measurement precision and known-groups validity (by care setting type and self-rating of overall mental health).

Results
The study recruited 4266 participants with a wide range of mental health diagnoses from multiple settings. The IRT parameters demonstrated excellent coverage of the latent construct with the centres of item information functions ranging from − 0.98 to 0.21 and with discrimination slope parameters from 1.4 to 3.6. We identified only two poorly fitting items and no evidence of differential item functioning of concern. Scales showed excellent measurement precision and known-groups validity.

Conclusion
The results from the IRT analyses confirm the robust structure properties and internal construct validity of the ReQoL instruments. The strong psychometric evidence generated guided item selection for the final versions of the ReQoL measures.  The results were also used in developing a health state classification for the ReQoL-Utility Index (ReQoL-UI) so that the ReQoL measures can be used to generate quality adjusted life years to reflect benefits of mental health interventions in cost effectiveness analyses

For the full article, please visit here.

To visit the ReQoL website, please click here.


Tuesday, 13 October 2020

Join us for our next webinar - Question of WHO, not IF?: Achieving Real Impact through Qualitative Systematic Reviews - Dr Andrew Booth - 3rd November - 1pm

Join us online for a monthly online masterclass by one of our health research experts based in The School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at The University of Sheffield as we explore topics in the changing world of public health research. In the coming months we plan to cover topics on health inequalities, global health, health decision and policy making, health technologies among other similar themes.

Book your place here

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/question-of-who-not-if-real-impact-with-qualitative-systematic-reviews-tickets-115099174730

Abstract:

Achieving impact is a core tenet of health services research and health technology assessment, extending far beyond the narrow definitions of impact promoted by journal impact factors (IFs) or by research assessment frameworks. One way of demonstrating real world impact is through publication of evidence syntheses that inform guidelines, such as those produced by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence(NICE). Recently guidelines organisations and health technology assessment agencies have started to fully recognise the important contribution that qualitative research can make in understanding the values and preferences of patients, carers, providers, managers and health planners. When these types of qualitative studies are harnessed by current real world crises such as Covid19, Severe Acute Malnutrition and Zika Virus they start to realise their considerable potential.

This presentation will briefly rehearse some of the key qualitative systematic review (also known as qualitative evidence synthesis) projects in which Dr Andrew Booth has collaborated before drawing out some lessons on key messages and impact. The presentation will offer an intriguing glimpse of how qualitative research feeds into national and international guidelines as well as taking a forward glance to the future role of qualitative evidence synthesis.

Bio

Dr Andrew Booth is Reader at ScHARR at the University of Sheffield and has been involved in health services research for over 25 years having previously pursued a career in health information management. A co-convenor of the Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group he has established himself as one of the most prolific contributors to the methodology of qualitative evidence synthesis. He delivers the international ScHARR short course on Evidence Synthesis of QUalItative Research in Europe (ESQUIRE), co-facilitates courses on rapid reviews, mixed methods and systematic reviews and teaches two Masters module for the online and face-to-face versions of the University of Sheffield's Masters in Public Health (MPH). The author, with ScHARR colleagues, of the popular text Systematic Approaches to a Successful Literature Review (soon to be in its 3rd edition), Andrew holds honorary contracts with the World Health Organisation and Public Health England. Andrew's academic interests extend through research metrics, research assessment and, most recently, real world impact!

Links

https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/scharr/people/staff/andrew-booth

https://twitter.com/AndrewB007h

Join the live session by clicking the link below...https://eu.bbcollab.com/guest/fbae374ad6ed4eeea1ed792b69cc2b6cThe live session takes place in a Collaborate webinar - headphones are advisable and easy to set up. You can join with a computer, tablet or smartphone, Chrome and Firefox offer the best browser experience. You can also use a phone to handle audio while in the session by dialling +44 2033 189610 and entering the PIN: 398 583 2702.

We look forward to seeing you online. 

Monday, 12 October 2020

NICE DSU latest one page summary for TSD 20

 





The latest of the TSD one page summaries is now live on the NICE Decision Support Unit website and it relates to Technical Support Document 20:

"Multivariate meta-analysis of summary data for combining treatment effects on correlated outcomes and evaluating surrogate endpoints"





For further information about the Multivariate meta-analysis TSD, please click here. 


For all other TSD one page summaries, please click here.


The Decision Support Unit (DSU) is commissioned by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to provide:

  • technical support to evaluation programmes;
  • advanced methodological development for all types of health technologies, including pharmaceuticals, medical and diagnostic technologies and related products;
  • educational support;
  • advanced methodological, analytical and other ad hoc support to NICE and its independent advisory bodies on the assessment of medicines and medical technologies;
  • quality assurance of economic models.

To visit the DSU website please visit http://nicedsu.org.uk/.

Tuesday, 6 October 2020

Latest Publications from HEDS in September

Here are the latest publications from September, including those 'In Press' by HEDS colleagues and their collaborators.

 

Research Synthesis Methods Journal cover
Research Synthesis
 Methods Journal
Booth, A., Cooper, C., Garside, R. and Britten, N., 2020. Response to: Goldberg et al., 2020.  “Who are the Researchers? Where are the Librarians?” Research Synthesis Methods, (jrsm.1449). https://doi.org/10.1002/jrsm.1449

Breeze, P., Thomas, C., Thokala, P., LaFortune, L., Brayne, C. and Brennan, A., 2020. The impact of including costs and outcomes of dementia in a health economic model to evaluate lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Medical Decision Making. https://doi.org/10.1177/0272989X20946758 


Cooper, K., Tappenden, P., Cantrell, A. and Ennis, K., 2020. A systematic review of meta-analyses assessing the validity of tumour response endpoints as surrogates for progression-free or overall survival in cancer. British Journal of Cancer.  https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-020-01050-w

David, G., Dixon, S. and Buykx, P., 2020. PMU21 Incorporating Preference Heterogeneity in Public Healthcare Policy Decision-Making: A Scoping Review of the Literature. Value in Health Regional Issues, 22, pp.S72–S72. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vhri.2020.07.379

Davillas, A. and Pudney, S., 2020. Biomarkers, disability and health care demand. Economics and Human Biology.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ehb.2019.100814 

Floreskul, V., Juma, F.Z., Daniel, A.B., Zamir, I., Rawdin, A., Stevenson, M., Mughal, Z. and Padidela, R., 2020. Cost-Effectiveness of Vitamin D Supplementation in Pregnant Woman and Young Children in Preventing Rickets: A Modeling Study.  2020. Frontiers in Public Health, 8. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2020.00439 

Keetharuth, A.D., Bjorner, J.B., Barkham, M., Browne, J., Croudace, T. and Brazier, J., 2020. An item response theory analysis of an item pool for the recovering quality of life (ReQoL) measure. Quality of Life Research. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-020-02622-2 

Quality of Life Research Journal cover
Quality of Life
 Research

Leaviss, J., Davis, S., Ren, S., Hamilton, J., Scope, A., Booth, A., Sutton, A., Parry, G., Buszewicz, M., Moss-Morris, R. and White, P., 2020. Behavioural modification interventions for medically unexplained symptoms in primary care: systematic reviews and economic evaluation. Health Technology Assessment, 24(46), pp.1–490. Doi: 10.3310/hta24460 

Love-Koh, J., Pennington, B., Owen, L., Taylor, M. and Griffin, S., 2020. How health inequalities accumulate and combine to affect treatment value: A distributional cost-effectiveness analysis of smoking cessation interventions. Social Science & Medicine, (113339), p.113339. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.113339 

Pilbery, R., Young, T. and Hodge, A., 2020. The effect of a specialist paramedic primary care rotation on appropriate non-conveyance decisions: a controlled interrupted time series analysis. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.08.06.20169334 

Rowen, D., Keetharuth, D., Poku, E., Wong, R., Pennington, R. and Wailoo, A., 2020. A review of the psychometric performance of selected child and adolescent preference-based measures used to produce utilities for child and adolescent health. Value in Health. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40273-019-00873-7 

Thokala, P., Carlson, J.J. and Drummond, M., 2020. HTA’d in the USA: A Comparison of ICER in the United States with NICE in England and Wales. Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy, 26(9), pp.1162–1170. https://doi.org/10.18553/jmcp.2020.26.9.1162 

Welie, A.G., Gebretekle, G.B., Stolk, E., Mukuria, C., Krahn, M.D., Enquoselassie, F. and Fenta, T.G., 2020. Valuing health state: An EQ-5D-5L value set for Ethiopians. Value in Health Regional Issues, 22, pp.7–14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vhri.2019.08.475 

Whitehurst, D.G.T., Brazier, J.E., Viney, R. and Mulhern, B.J., 2020. The SF-6Dv2: How Does the New Classification System Impact the Distribution of Responses Compared with the Original SF-6D? PharmacoEconomics. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40273-020-00957-9 

PharmacoEconomics journal cover
PharmacoEconomics
Wickramasekera, N. and Tubeuf, S., 2020. Measuring quality of life for people with common mental health problems. Journal of Mental Health. https://doi.org/10.1080/09638237.2020.1818190 

Xie, S., Wu, J., He, X., Chen, G. and Brazier, J.E., 2020. Do Discrete Choice Experiments Approaches Perform Better Than Time Trade-Off in Eliciting Health State Utilities? Evidence From SF-6Dv2 in China. Value in Health. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jval.2020.06.010 

 

Monday, 5 October 2020

New HEDS Discussion Paper - Selection and validation of a classification system for a child-centred caries-specific utility measure

Helen Rodgers, Fiona Gilchrist, Zoe Marshman, Helen Rodd and Donna Rowen

                                                          Abstract
Picture of Donna Rowen
Dr Donna Rowen
Background: Caries Impacts and Experiences Questionnaire for Children (CARIES-QC) is a child-centred caries-specific quality of life measure. This study aimed to select, and validate with children, a classification system for a paediatric condition-specific preference-based measure, based on CARIES-QC.

Methods: First, a provisional classification system for a preference-based measure based on CARIES-QC was developed using Rasch analysis, psychometric testing, involvement of children and parents, and the developer of CARIES-QC. Second, qualitative, semi-structured ‘think aloud’ validation interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of children with dental caries. The interviewer aimed to identify whether items were considered important and easily understood, whether any were overlapping and if any excluded items should be reintroduced. Interview recordings were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis conducted.

Results: Rasch analysis identified poor item spread for the items ‘cross’ and ‘school’. Items relating to eating were correlated and the better performing items were considered for selection. Children expressed some confusion regarding the items ‘school’ and ‘food stuck’. Parent representatives thought that impacts surrounding toothbrushing (‘brushing’) were encompassed by the item ‘hurt’. Five items were selected from CARIES-QC for inclusion in the provisional classification system; ‘hurt’, ‘annoy’, ‘carefully’, ‘kept awake’ and ‘cried’. Validation interviews were conducted with 20 children aged 5-16 years old. Participants thought the questionnaire was straightforward and covered a range of impacts. Children thought an item about certain foods being ‘hard to eat’ was more relevant than one about having to eat more carefully because of their teeth and so the ‘carefully’ item was replaced with ‘hard to eat’.

Conclusion: Following child-centred modification, the preliminary five-item classification system is considered valid and suitable for use in a valuation survey. The innovative child-centred methods used to both identify and validate the classification system can be applied in the development of other preference-based measures.

Monday, 28 September 2020

New HEDS Discussion Paper - Mapping the Health of Nation Outcomes Scale (HoNOS) onto the Recovering Quality of Life Utility Index (ReQoL-UI)

Anju Keetharuth and Donna Rowen

                                          Abstract

Picture of Dr Anju Devianee Keetharuth
Dr Anju Devianee Keetharuth

Aim: The aim of this project is to develop and assess a mapping function to predict ReQoL-UI (a patient-reported mental health-specific preference-based measure) scores from HoNOS scores (clinician-reported measure, Health of Nation Outcomes Score).

Methods: Participants were recruited from 14 secondary mental health services in England, UK, and their clinician completed HoNoS. Mapping models were estimated using Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) on individual level and mean level data and different model specifications were explored. Model performance was assessed using mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), percentage of observations with absolute errors greater than 0.1, and plots of the observed and predicted ReQoL-UI utilities and errors.

Results: Matched ReQoL-UI and HoNOS scores were collected for 649 participants. The sample comprised 56% inpatients, with overall mean ReQoL-UI utility of 0.683 and range from 1 to -0.195. Correlations between ReQoL-UI (items and utility) and HoNOS scores were moderate (0.2<r<0.4) or small (<0.2). The best model was OLS estimated using mean level data, with lowest MAE (0.046) and RMSE (0.056).

Discussion: There is little conceptual overlap between ReQoL-UI and HoNOS. They measure different concepts and, arguably, service users and clinicians, who complete the measures respectively, have different perspectives. Under these circumstances, caution is recommended when applying these estimates.        

Download the Discussion Paper here.     
Picture of Donna Rowen
Dr Donna Rowen

             

Tuesday, 22 September 2020

Join us for our webinar - The everyday things that shape our actions: The influence of the environment on health behaviour - Dr Emma Hock - 8th October, 1pm

The everyday things that shape our actions: The influence of the environment on health behaviour




Presenter Dr Emma Hock

Abstract
The environments in which we live have changed to make our lives easier. An increase in labour-saving devices and easy access to high energy-dense food has negatively impacted on population health, however, and individual behaviours cannot fully address this. There has been recent interest in ‘nudging’ (changes in the immediate environment that relate to health-related behaviour). In this webinar, we will examine how such changes to the environment in which we live and work can impact on people’s health-related behaviours. We will explore lab-based research research on nudges and examine how these techniques can be applied in the real world.

Bio
Dr Emma Hock is a Senior Research Fellow in ScHARR. She has a background in health behaviour change and teaches on health psychology and health behaviour change approaches and techniques on two Masters courses run by ScHARR. Emma has a track record of research in preventative health behaviour, with a specific research interest in smoking cessation and physical activity, multiple health behaviour change and physical activity and mental health. Emma completed a PhD in physical activity and smoking abstinence in young smokers in 2007, and also worked on a two-year MRC-funded research project that investigated walking as an aid to cessation: a feasibility study within the NHS stop smoking service (Walk-2-Quit).
https://twitter.com/EmmaEversonHock
https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/scharr/people/staff/emma-hock

Join the live session by clicking the link below... 

The live session takes place in a Collaborate webinar - headphones are advisable and easy to set up. You can join with a computer, tablet or smartphone, Chrome and Firefox offer the best browser experience. You can also use a phone to handle audio while in the session by dialling +44 2033 189610 and entering the PIN: 398 583 2702.
We look forward to seeing you online. 

Friday, 4 September 2020

Latest Publications from HEDS in August

 

Once again we explore what new publications have been produced by HEDS in collaboration with colleagues in ScHARR and further afield. Many of these are currently in press, so you can find much of our work in its open access form via our institutional repository. You can view them and many others here.

BMJ Journal Open

Aber, A., Phillips, P., Lumley, E., Radley, S., Thomas, S.M., Nawaz, S., Jones, G. and Michaels, J., 2020. Mixed methods study to develop the content validity and the conceptual framework of the electronic patient-reported outcome measure for vascular conditions. BMJ Open, 10(8). http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-034154


Cooper, K., Tappenden, P., Cantrell, A. and Ennis, K., 2020. A systematic review of meta-analyses assessing the validity of tumour response endpoints as surrogates for progression-free or overall survival in cancer. British Journal of Cancer. Available at: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/164684/


Pilbery, R., Young, T. and Hodge, A., 2020. The effect of a specialist paramedic primary care rotation on appropriate non-conveyance decisions: a controlled interrupted time series analysis. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.08.06.20169334


Powell, P., Carlton, J., Woods, H. and Mazzone, P., 2020. Measuring quality of life in Duchenne muscular dystrophy : a systematic review of the content and structural validity of commonly used instruments. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 18(263). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12955-020-01511-z


Salway, S., Booth, A., Such, E., Hamilton, J., Powell, K., Preston, L., Victor, C. and Raghavan, R., 2020. How can loneliness and social isolation be reduced among migrant and minority ethnic people? Systematic, participatory review of programme theories, system processes and outcomes. [online] National Institute for Health Research. Available at: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/164681/


Si, L., Willis, M.S., Asseburg, C., Nilsson, A., Tew, M., Clarke, P.M., Lamotte, M., Ramos, M., Shao, H., Shi, L., Zhang, P., McEwan, P., Ye, W., Herman, W.H., Kuo, S., Isaman, D.J., Schramm, W., Sailer, F., Brennan, A., Pollard, D., Smolen, H.J., Leal, J., Gray, A., Patel, R., Feenstra, T. and Palmer, A.J., 2020. Evaluating the ability of economic models of diabetes to simulate new cardiovascular outcomes trials : a report on the Ninth Mount Hood Diabetes Challenge. Value in Health. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jval.2020.04.1832   


Value in Health Journal

Srivastava, T., Strong, M., Stevenson, M.D. and Dodd, P.J., 2020. Improving Cycle Corrections in Discrete Time Markov Models: A Gaussian Quadrature Approach. Available at: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/164871/


Tong, T., Aber, A., Chilcott, J., Thokala, P., Walters, S.J., Maheswaran, R., Nawaz, S., Thomas, S. and Michaels, J., 2020. Volume–outcome relationships in open and endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: administrative data 2006–2018. British Journal of Surgery. https://doi.org/10.1002/bjs.11919

 


Wednesday, 26 August 2020

Website of the month for August - Altmetric Bookmarklet for Researchers

Not so much a website this month but a snazzy little plug in for researchers and librarians among other research professionals that helps you find out how much attention a research publication has received. This little tool has been around for quite a while and is simple to use and can provide insights on whether your paper has been mentioned in the media, in Wikipedia or across social media platforms like Twitter.

You can obtain the web extension for Chrome, Firefox and Safari here 

https://www.altmetric.com/products/free-tools/bookmarklet/



More information from Altmetric.com

  • The Bookmarklet only works on PubMed, arXiv or pages containing a DOI with Google Scholar friendly citation metadata
  • Twitter mentions are only available for articles published since July 2011
  • You can request support for a particular journal by asking @altmetric for it on Twitter
  • Are you a publisher? Don’t use this bookmarklet! We have much better tools for you, just get in touch.