HEDS is part of the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield. We undertake research, teaching, training and consultancy on all aspects of health related decision science, with a particular emphasis on health economics, HTA and evidence synthesis.

Thursday, 21 February 2019

Join us for our FREE Measuring and Valuing Health online course - MOOC - 4th March

HEDS are running their popular Measuring and Valuing Health online course - MOOC on Measuring and Valuing Health through the FutureLearn platform from the 4th of March.

Learn how Patient Reported Outcome Measures and Quality Adjusted Life Years can compare treatments and inform healthcare spending.

Sign up here


Image of FutureLearn course page
FutureLearn course page
How do we decide which drugs and treatments to fund?
Healthcare systems around the world are increasingly under pressure to fund drugs, treatments and other healthcare interventions.
On this course, you’ll learn how health outcome measures can help us to make more informed decisions about where to spend our limited healthcare budgets.
You can continue to learn about healthcare decision-making with our next course Health Technology Assessment (HTA): Choosing Which Treatments Get Funded.
What topics will we cover?

The course focuses on two different types of measures, asking how they’re developed and calculated, and how they’re used by decision makers in practice:

Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs): which are measures completed by the patients themselves, about their health, symptoms, functioning, well-being or satisfaction with treatment.

Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs): which compare the benefits of different treatment options, based on the quality and quantity of life they yield.

By the end of the course, you'll be able to...

Discuss what health means and how to measure its impact on quality of life.

Evaluate how to develop and use patient reported outcome measures including their limitations in decision-making.

Calculate QALYs in simple examples to arrive at values which can be used to compare treatment benefits.

Perform a time trade off to develop an understanding of how this method can be used to value health states and generate preference weights.

Debate who should value our health. Should it be patients, health professionals or the general public and should this be different for children’s health?

Compare where QALYs are used in healthcare decision-making worldwide and discuss the merits of this method compared to those used where you live.


Who is the course for?

This course will help you understand how and why choices about drugs and treatments have been made. It may inspire you to think about a career in healthcare, local decision making or academia.

You may even wish to take your learning further, with the University of Sheffield’s Masters degrees and short courses in areas such as health economics, public health and international healthcare technology assessment.

You can find out more about this subject in Dr Katherine Stevens’ post for the FutureLearn blog: “How do we make decisions in healthcare about which drugs and treatments to fund?

What do people say about this course?

"Thank you for a very well structured and presented course. The interactive elements (trying out the measures and voting) helped me think and engage more. This is a great introduction to a complex subject and has motivated me to find out more."

Gill Charman


Course leaders.

Tuesday, 19 February 2019

How we find the tools for the Systematic Review Toolbox

Image of Anthea Sutton
Anthea Sutton
HEDS Information Resources Group Manager Anthea Sutton has written for the Systematic Review Toolbox about how tools are selected for the Toolbox.
You might have noticed we’ve added a few new things to the toolbox site recently to give our users a bit more information on how the toolbox works.  We’ve recently published our eligibility criteria for tools here, but how do we find potential candidates for inclusion in the first place?
Regular visitors, particularly those who follow @SRToolbox on Twitter, may know that we run a search on MEDLINE every month, with the aim to find any new tools, or new papers about existing tools.  The search strategy was developed from a mapping exercise we conducted in 2017.  We analysed the existing papers catalogued in the toolbox using the Yale MeSH Analyzer tool.  This identified 77 MeSH headings which were ranked in order of frequency.  The bibliographic data (including abstracts) of the analysed publications were then uploaded to VOSviewer and a density visualization map (See Figure 1) was generated to identify a network of frequently occurring and relevant free-text terms.
Figure 1: Part of the Density Visualization Map generated via VOSviewer showing the most frequently occurring terms in red.
The MEDLINE search strategy was then developed based on the findings of the mapping exercise.
But this is only part of the story.  We have found very little duplication across the different retrieval methods we use, therefore using a range of approaches seems to be best.  An analysis of the tools identified between January and September 2018 revealed that while the MEDLINE search is successful at identifying unique tools, engaging with the systematic review community via the toolbox website and social media found the most tools.  So, as we have always said, the toolbox needs you! If you see, hear about, or develop a tool, please add it to the site here to help us ensure the toolbox remains current, relevant and useful. And do feel free to contact us with any queries or suggestions.
This post originally appeared on the Systematic Reviews Toolbox website

Monday, 18 February 2019

January’s CEAs.....

We’ve completed our quick search for CEA’s published last month.   In the right-hand column of this blog is a CEA Archive of all records.  Below are those in our areas of interest.
  • Campbell JR, Johnston JC, Ronald LA, Sadatsafavi M, Balshaw RF, Cook VJ, et al. Screening for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Migrants With CKD: A Cost-effectiveness Analysis. American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation. 2019;73(1):39-50.
  • Castillo-Jimenez DA, Garcia-Perdomo HA. Re: Niranjan J. Sathianathen, Badrinath R. Konety, Fernando Alarid-Escudero, Nathan Lawrentschuk, Damien M. Bolton, Karen M. Kuntz. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Active Surveillance Strategies for Men with Low-risk Prostate Cancer. Eur Urol. In press. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eururo.2018.10.055: Standardized Reporting for Economic Analyses Should be Mandatory. European urology. 2019.
  • Culyer AJ, Chalkidou K. Economic Evaluation for Health Investments En Route to Universal Health Coverage: Cost-Benefit Analysis or Cost-Effectiveness Analysis? Value in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. 2019;22(1):99-103.
  • Wang SY, Chen T, Dang W, Mougalian SS, Evans SB, Gross CP. Incorporating Tumor Characteristics to Maximize 21-Gene Assay Utility: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN. 2019;17(1):39-46.
  • Yang F, Devlin N, Luo N. Cost-Utility Analysis Using EQ-5D-5L Data: Does How the Utilities Are Derived Matter? Value in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. 2019;22(1):45-9.

Thursday, 14 February 2019

HEDS Report on Smoking and the risks of adult diseases

Laura Webster Colin Angus, Alan Brennan, and Duncan Gillespie have written a short report detailing the risks of disease linked to smoking used in The University of Sheffield's health economic modelling of smoking policies and interventions. You can access the report form here 

Image of a HEDS report front page

Tuesday, 12 February 2019

Latest Publications from HEDS for January

We've had another productive month publishing high quality research in collaboration with colleagues in ScHARR and further afield. Many of these are currently in press, so you can find much of our work in its open access form via our institutional repository. Tuck in here.
Image of Value in Health journal
Value in Health 
       Bell Gorrod, H., Latimer, N. R., Damian, D., Hettle, R., Harty, G. T. & Wong, S. L. (n.d.) Impact of Non-Randomised Dropout on Treatment Switching Adjustment in the Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis CLARITY Trial and the CLARITY Extension Study. Value in Health.

        Booth, A., Noyes, J., Flemming, K., Moore, G., Tunçalp, Ö. & Shakibazadeh, E. (2019) Formulating questions to explore complex interventions within qualitative evidence synthesis. BMJ Global Health. [Online] 4 (Suppl 1), e001107–e001107.

       Booth, A. (2019) Harnessing Energies, Resolving Tensions: Acknowledging a Dual Heritage for Qualitative Evidence Synthesis. Qualitative Health Research. [Online] 29 (1), 18–31.

Booth, A., Moore, G., Flemming, K., Garside, R., Rollins, N., Tunçalp, Ö. & Noyes, J. (2019) Taking account of context in systematic reviews and guidelines considering a complexity perspective. BMJ Global Health. [Online] 4 (Suppl 1), e000840–e000840.

Brazier, J. E., Rowen, D. L., Lloyd, A. & Karimi, M. (2019) Future directions in valuing benefits for estimating QALYs: is time up for the EQ-5D? Value in Health. [Online] 22 (1), 62–68.

Image of Quality of Life Research journal
           Quality of Life Research
Brennan, A., Hill-McManus, D., Stone, T., Buykx, P., Ally, A., Pryce, R. E., Alston, R., Jones, A., Cairns, D., Millar, T., Donmall, M., Phillips, T., Meier, P. & Drummond, C. (2019) Modeling the Potential Impact of Changing Access Rates to Specialist Treatment for Alcohol Dependence for Local Authorities in England: The Specialist Treatment for Alcohol Model (STreAM). Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, Supplement. [Online] (s18), 96–109.

Chuang, L.-H., Cohen, A. T., Agnelli, G., Gumbs, P. D., Bauersachs, R., Kroep, S., Gitt, A. K., Monreal, M., Willich, S. N. & van Hout, B. (2019) Comparison of quality of life measurements: EQ-5D-5L versus disease/treatment-specific measures in pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Quality of Life Research. [Online]

Davis, S., Goodacre, S., Pandor, A., Horner, D., Stevens, J. W., Wit, K. & Hunt, B. J. (2019) Decision‐analysis modelling of the effects of thromboprophylaxis for people with lower limb immobilisation for injury. British Journal of Haematology. [Online]

Flemming, K., Booth, A., Garside, R., Tunçalp, Ö. & Noyes, J. (2019) Qualitative evidence synthesis for complex interventions and guideline development: clarification of the purpose, designs and relevant methods. BMJ Global Health. [Online] 4 (Suppl 1), e000882–e000882.

Flight, L., Arshad, F., Barnsley, R., Patel, K., Julious, S., Brennan, A. & Todd, S. (n.d.) A Review of Clinical Trials with an Adaptive Design and Health Economic Analysis. Value in Health.

Image of BMC Medical Research Methodology journal
BMC Medical
Research Methodology    
       France, E. F., Cunningham, M., Ring, N., Uny, I., Duncan, E. A. S., Jepson, R. G., Maxwell, M., Roberts, R. J., Turley, R. L., Booth, A., Britten, N., Flemming, K., Gallagher, I., Garside, R., Hannes, K., Lewin, S., Noblit, G. W., Pope, C., Thomas, J., Vanstone, M., Higginbottom, G. M. A. & Noyes, J. (2019) Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: the eMERGe reporting guidance. BMC Medical Research Methodology. [Online] 19 (1), .

       France, E. F., Cunningham, M., Ring, N., Uny, I., Duncan, E. A. S., Jepson, R. G., Maxwell, M., Roberts, R. J., Turley, R. L., Booth, A., Britten, N., Flemming, K., Gallagher, I., Garside, R., Hannes, K., Lewin, S., Noblit, G. W., Pope, C., Thomas, J., Vanstone, M., Higginbottom, G. M. A. & Noyes, J. (n.d.) Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: The eMERGe reporting guidance. Psycho-Oncology. [Online]

France, E. F., Cunningham, M., Ring, N., Uny, I., Duncan, E. A. S., Jepson, R. G., Maxwell, M., Roberts, R. J., Turley, R. L., Booth, A., Britten, N., Flemming, K., Gallagher, I., Garside, R., Hannes, K., Lewin, S., Noblit, G. W., Pope, C., Thomas, J., Vanstone, M., Higginbottom, G. M. A. & Noyes, J. (n.d.) Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: The eMERGe reporting guidance. Journal of Advanced Nursing. [Online]

France, E. F., Cunningham, M., Ring, N., Uny, I., Duncan, E. A. S., Jepson, R. G., Maxwell, M., Roberts, R. J., Turley, R. L., Booth, A., Britten, N., Flemming, K., Gallagher, I., Garside, R., Hannes, K., Lewin, S., Noblit, G. W., Pope, C., Thomas, J., Vanstone, M., Higginbottom, G. M. A. & Noyes, J. (n.d.) Improving reporting of meta-ethnography: The eMERGe reporting guidance. Review of Education. [Online]

Franklin, M. & Thorn, J. (2019) Self-reported and routinely collected electronic healthcare resource-use data for trial-based economic evaluations: the current state of play in England and considerations for the future. BMC Medical Research Methodology. [Online] 19 (1), .

Kristensen, F. B., Husereau, D., Huić, M., Drummond, M., Berger, M. L., Bond, K., Augustovski, F., Booth, A., Bridges, J. F. P., Grimshaw, J., IJzerman, M. J., Jonsson, E., Ollendorf, D. A., Rüther, A., Siebert, U., Sharma, J. & Wailoo, A. (2019) Identifying the Need for Good Practices in Health Technology Assessment: Summary of the ISPOR HTA Council Working Group Report on Good Practices in HTA. Value in Health. [Online] 22 (1), 13–20.

Noyes, J., Booth, A., Moore, G., Flemming, K., Tunçalp, Ö. & Shakibazadeh, E. (2019) Synthesising quantitative and qualitative evidence to inform guidelines on complex interventions: clarifying the purposes, designs and outlining some methods. BMJ Global Health. [Online] 4 (Suppl 1), e000893–e000893.

Image of BMJ Open logo
  BMJ Open
Peters, R., Booth, A., Rockwood, K., Peters, J., D’Este, C. & Anstey, K. J. (2019) Combining modifiable risk factors and risk of dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Open. [Online] 9 (1), .

Powell, P. A., Carlton, J., Rowen, D. & Brazier, J. (n.d.) Producing a preference-based quality of life measure for people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A mixed-methods study protocol. BMJ Open.

Stolk, E., Ludwig, K., Rand, K., van Hout, B. & Ramos-Goñi, J. M. (2019) Overview, Update, and Lessons Learned From the International EQ-5D-5L Valuation Work: Version 2 of the EQ-5D-5L Valuation Protocol. Value in Health. [Online] 22 (1), 23–30.

Di Tanna, G. L., Porter, J. K., Lipton, R. B., Brennan, A., Palmer, S., Hatswell, A. J., Sapra, S. & Villa, G. (2019) Migraine day frequency in migraine prevention: longitudinal modelling approaches. BMC Medical Research Methodology. [Online] 19 (1), .

Image of PharmacoEconomics journal
PharmacoEconomics
       Walton, M. J., O’Connor, J., Carroll, C., Claxton, L. & Hodgson, R. (2019) A Review of Issues Affecting the Efficiency of Decision Making in the NICE Single Technology Appraisal Process. PharmacoEconomics - Open. [Online]

       Webster, L., Angus, C., Brennan, A. & Gillespie, D. (n.d.) Smoking and the risks of adult diseases. [Online]  Available from: https://ndownloader.figshare.com/files/13710728.

       Wildman, M., Hutchings, M., Arden, M., O’Cathain, A., Drabble, S., Walters, S. J., Tappenden, P., Beever, D., Whelan, P., Bradley, J., Cantrill, H., Maguire, C. & Hind, D. (n.d.) Development and evaluation of an intervention to support Adherence to treatment in adults with Cystic Fibrosis: A randomised controlled trial and parallel process evaluation protocol. [Online]  Available from: https://ndownloader.figshare.com/files/13575974.

Wong, C. K. H., Tong, T. S., Cheng, G. H. L., Tang, E. H. M., Thokala, P., Tse, E. T. Y. & Lam, C. L. K. (n.d.) Direct medical costs in the preceding, event and subsequent years of first severe hypoglycaemia requiring hospital transfer: A population-based cohort study. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism: a journal of pharmacology and therapeutics. [Online]

Monday, 11 February 2019

MRC Skills Development Fellowship at ScHARR

image of Medical Research Council logo
Medical Research Council    

The MRC-funded University of Sheffield Skills Development Fellowship Programme in Population Health Systems Science and Decision Modelling is a collaboration between ScHARR, partners from across the university and the Bradford Institute for Health Research.

We appointed two excellent fellows in our first round, and applications are now open for 2019. 

The fellowship is a three-year personal award, at grade 7, and includes training and research support costs. 

We are particularly looking for rising star early career researchers with a quantitative background (maths, stats, computation, economics) who have not worked in health research, or early career researchers from a health background who have very strong quantitative skills and ability.

Details about the programme are here: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/scharr/research/mrc_sdf

Friday, 8 February 2019

NICE DSU release three Technical Support Document summaries (TSD)

NICE DSU have released three Technical Support Document summaries (TSD). You can view all three here and follow the work of the Decision Support Unit on their website here 
NICE DSU Technical Support Document Summaries




Thursday, 31 January 2019

Website of the month for January datawrapper.de

We've sneaked this month's website of the month in on the very last day of the month, but it was well worth waiting for. HEDS very own Senior Research Fellow Colin Angus has picked
www.datawrapper.de as a website you should know about.

Colin wrote the following review.If your latest paper or HTA report could do with the addition of some funky graphs, then www.datawrapper.de is a brilliant resource. You can upload a csv file or even just paste data from Excel directly into the interface, and in a few clicks you can create a wide range of different charts, including a few slightly more unusual options which can be a real pain to cobble together in Excel. There is also an excellent map option which is amazing if you haven't got the mad GIS skills you otherwise need to create beautiful chloropleth maps.

Image of https://www.datawrapper.de/ website
https://www.datawrapper.de/
As an added bonus, the website also hosts an excellent and very accessible blog, which covers topics like tips on choosing colours, including which colours you should use to represent gender and a series of tips for creating great stacked barline, area and pie charts as well as lovely maps. These are well worth a read, even if you never use the website to draw your charts (because you love Excel too much, or are some kind of ninja with ggplot).
It's worth noting that there are several other, similar websites out there which will draw nice graphs for you. There's a handy overview of some of them here.

Tuesday, 29 January 2019

HEDS Short Course - An Introduction to using Social Media to Communicate Research

An Introduction to using Social Media to Communicate Research

1 day course:  Thursday, 27th June 2019

Background

The treadmill of academia is a relentless one: proposal, research, write, present and then hopefully publish before starting all over again, all in the hope that the research is recognised as being of good quality, worthy and valuable. There's one problem though - journals are not geared up for the modern online world of instant sharing and communication. Tools and ways of communicating research such as Twitter, YouTube, ResearchGate, Slideshare, blogging, infographics, animation and many others will be covered. The good news is they are mostly free and can work together to help research to reach a wider audience. That audience is not just academic peers, but publishers, editors, fund holders and the general public.

Course Overview

The aim of the workshop is to offer an introduction to the many tools you can use to help you communicate research and work smarter. The purpose of the day is to help attendees come away with a variety of tools and artefacts they can use to help communicate and share their work. We will teach you basics of social media in an academic setting and demystify some of the barriers that may have put you off from using these tools in your work.
We will show you how to make the most from these technologies and show you how to find out alternative ways of discussing and communicating research. Attention will be paid to the various ethical issues to working more on the web from copyright and Creative Commons to making more use of your mobile device, from safety and security to how you conduct yourself online and netiquette.

Who will benefit from this course?

This short course will benefit a wide range of people including (but not exhaustive of):
  • Researchers,
  • Masters and PhD students,
  • Research Support Staff and Managers,
  • Library and Information Professionals,
  • Communications and Marketing Professionals.

Course Materials

Course Materials will be provided via a Delegate Course Website approximately 2 weeks prior to the course start date. Hard copies of exercises will be provided throughout the course. Hard copies of powerpoint presentations will not be provided, but these can be printed by delegates before the start of the course via the Delegate Course Website.
Participants are asked to provide their own laptop/tablet for the duration of the course.

Course Faculty

Date and Times

1 day course: Thursday, 27th June 2019

Start:  9:30 am
Finish: 4:30 pm

Fees

£299.00 - Early Bird Rate for confirmed bookings received on or before Sunday, 28th April 2019.
£399.00 - Standard Rate for confirmed bookings received on or after Thursday, 13th June 2019.
Bookings will automatically close at 11pm on Thursday, 13th June 2019.

Booking and Payment

Provisional bookings are now being taken for the next intake of this course.  Please email your details to Karen Holden at scharr-scu@sheffield.ac.uk and you will be contacted when this course has gone live on the Online Store and bookings are being accepted.
All of our ScHARR short course bookings are initially processed through our Online Store. Payment is by Credit/Debit Card or PayPal and via Invoice (purchase order required).

Monday, 28 January 2019

HEDS Short Course - The Application of Psychometrics for Measuring Health Outcomes and Quality of Life - Part 1

The Application of Psychometrics for Measuring Health Outcomes and Quality of Life - Part 1

2 days course - Monday, 20th - Tuesday, 21st May 2019




Overview

The aim of this 2 day course is to provide participants with an introduction to psychometrics as applied to health. It will cover the core psychometric and statistical methods used in scale construction and the development of multi-item patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Sessions will be delivered by external staff Professor Jakob Bue Bjorner - Optum Patient Insights and Georgina Jones - Leeds becket University, who have an international reputation in psychometric methods and questionnaire development, analysis and interpretation and ScHARR Staff Anju Keetharuth. The course will be interactive and practical. Sessions will be delivered using lectures and individual and small group practical exercises using real world examples.

Who will benefit from this course?

The course content is aimed at participants with no prior knowledge of psychometrics or those who wish to refresh and gain more theoretical and practical knowledge in this area. The course content is set at a basic/intermediate level. It will focus on classical methods of test construction and test of differential item function, but will also provide an introduction to modern psychometric methods such as Rasch models, item response theory and factor analysis for categorical data. It will be relevant to researchers, students, clinicians and other health care professionals and members of the pharmaceutical industry interested in using or developing PROMs.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course participants should be able to:
  • Identify the key stages involved in scale construction and development
  • Understand the qualitative process involved in the development of a PROM and item generation
  • Describe the different ways of scoring and scaling a PROM and the theory underpinning these
  • Understand exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory (CFA) factor analysis and be able to carry out EFA using SPSS
  • Understand what is meant by reliability, validity, and responsiveness and be able to analyse and interpret these using SPSS
  • Explore the above concepts using datasets from a range of existing disease-specific and generic PROMs
  • Be aware of the use of different software other than SPSS where applicable.

Course Materials

Course Materials will be provided via a Delegate Course Website approximately 2 weeks prior to the course start date. Hard copies of exercises will be provided throughout the course. Hard copies of powerpoint presentations will not be provided, but these can be printed by delegates before the start of the course via the Delegate Course Website.
Participants are asked to supply their own Laptop throughout the course. Participants will work on laptops using SPSS during the course.  Working knowledge of SPSS would be beneficial but is not essential. If you do not have access to SPSS on your laptop, then a link to download will be provided prior to starting the course.

Further Learning (PART 2 Advanced)

An advanced course will be run immediately following on from this course (Wednesday, 22nd - Friday, 24th May 2019), which will cover Rasch models, item response theory, confirmatory factor analysis and factor analysis for categorical data in more detail using MPlus software. 
Furthers details of PART 2 Advanced can be found here:

Course Faculty

Anju Keetharuth is the Course Leader for this course.
Georgina Jones

This course is now live on our Online Store, and we are currently taking bookings.
All of our short course bookings are initially processed through our Online Store.  Payment is required at the time of booking (Credit/Debit card or PayPal is accepted).
If your employer is paying your fees and they would prefer to be invoiced, please ensure you have your Purchase Order details before making your booking.  Bookings are NOT confirmed until receipt of the Purchase Order is received at scharr-scu@sheffield.ac.uk
If you have any queries relating to fees and payment, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Venue

Halifax Hall Hotel & Conference Centre
Endcliffe Vale Road,
Sheffield,
S10 3ER.

Contact

For further information please do not hesitate to contact us via email at scharr-scu@sheffield.ac.uk
or call +44 (0)114 222 2968.